Home » Home Server » How to integrate FlexGet and Transmission for downloads
Home Server

How to integrate FlexGet and Transmission for downloads

If you have been following our FlexGet tutorials you know by now that this lite software is an amazing app for your home server, whether you use FlexGet on Windows or FlexGet on Ubuntu. You can configure FlexGet for a variety of tasks and integrate it with your preferred software, to automate your media server downloads. Of course, when we talk about media server downloads, we think about apps such as Transmission, a bittorrent client that runs on a variety of OSes and lets you download your media easily. What you might not know, is that you can Integrate FlexGet and Transmission to work together in your media server setup. How? We tell you in this article. [Read: Install Transmission with web interface on Ubuntu]

Update: Are you a beginner to FlexGet? Read our Beginner Blueprint: Complete FlexGet Setup Guide and find relevant information about installing, configuring, and using this application.

Integrate Transmission and FlexGet image
Integrate FlexGet with the Transmission bittorrent client to automate your torrent downloads.

It should be no surprise that there’s a Transmission FlexGet Howto tutorial, to integrate both of them. After all, you can do many other things with FlexGet besides integrate FlexGet and Transmission. You can integrate FlexGet and CouchPotato, to download the movies on your CouchPotato wanted list. You can also automate these processes if you use the FlexGet Daemon mode. To use FlexGet and Transmission together, you should set up a Transmission FlexGet Config file, within the config.yml file on your FlexGet installation.

Recommended HTPC / Home Server Builds 2017

How to integrate FlexGet and Transmission?

To begin with FlexGet configuration in order to use Flexget with transmission, you should make sure that the transmissionrpc library is installed. To install transmissionrpc, you will have to run one of these commands in Ubuntu terminal or similar.

easy_install transmissionrpc
pip install transmissionrpc

If you perform this first step to integrate FlexGet and Transmission and do it correctly, you should see something similar to this:

Transmission FlexGet Howto
You should see something like this on your terminal when installing transmissionrpc.

If you are required to upgrade transmissionrpc simply add --upgrade to the command used.

FlexGet Transmission Config file

Now it’s time to configure FlexGet to pass the URL of its entries to the Transmission bittorrent client. For this to happen, you need to add the following entry to the config.yml file on your FlexGet installation:

transmission:
host: localhost
port: 9091
username: myusername
password: mypassword
FlexGet Transmission Config example
This is an example of a default FlexGet Transmission Config file. Note the username and password are the default ones for transmissionrpc.

Note that for this configuration file we’re using the default parameters of transmission. If you haven’t changed the username and password, it will be transmission for both fields as well.

That’s it! You have successfully edited your configuration file to integrate FlexGet and Transmission bittorrent client. If you need more information about the transmission plugin, have a look at the transmission plugin FlexGet wiki page. This setup also supports magnet links, so you will have more freedom of choice when working with FlexGet and Transmission for your downloads. If you need more tips to configure your FlexGet installation, have a look at our FlexGet configuration guide.

You can also setup FlexGet email notification in order to always be informed about the state of your downloads. The possibilities with FlexGet are endless, because it’s a lite and modular software, though it doesn’t have a graphical interface yet. A FlexGet WebUI is on the works, and this will make it easier to work with FlexGet and open up even more possibilities to automate your downloads with it, so stay tuned!

About the author

Alejandro

Alejandro is an electrical engineer, working as a software developer and part-time writer. He has a passion for technology, languages and games, and has been around the web since 2004.

Archives

Join the other 110,000 followers